New issue of Music & Copyright with Germany country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

EU committees’ views on upload filters highlight differing attitudes to modern copyright protection
The European Commission (EC) is currently pushing forward with a set of reforms aimed at overhauling the current rules on copyright. Delivered by President Jean-Claude Junker as part of his “state of the union” address at the European Parliament last year, the proposals formed part of the EC’s Digital Single Market initiative. Included in the proposals were new rules on how video-sharing platforms remunerate the online exploitation of creators’ works and how those works are protected. Controversially, Junker introduced the idea that the video platforms will have an obligation to deploy effective means to automatically detect songs or audiovisual works that rights holders have identified. In July, two committees involved in the process of establishing the precise wording of the copyright reforms gave their opinions on the role of upload filters to weed out copyright-infringing content. The subsequent views and opinions from industry stakeholders and rights activists suggest the road to a comprehensive and all-encompassing agreement may be a long one.

Stream-ripping research questions YouTube’s status as a valued partner to the music industry
New research published by PRS for Music and the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO) has concluded that stream ripping is now the most prevalent and fastest-growing form of music piracy in the UK. Nearly 70% of music-specific infringement is dominated by the illegal online activity. PRS and the IPO jointly commissioned two separate studies to understand the impact of stream ripping on the UK market and on online consumer behavior. The research adds to a number of studies that have highlighted how online piracy is shifting from websites offering access to downloads toward stream ripping from a variety of music and video services. Repeating previous research, PRS and the IPO identified Google-owned YouTube as the most popular source of content for stream-ripping sites. Although the majority of traffic to stream-ripping sites was found to come from individuals seeking the sites directly, search engines were also believed to be delivering a significant proportion of traffic to the illegal services.

HDS ZAMP reports rise in domestic and international royalty receipts
Croatian authors’ society HDS ZAMP registered a positive year for royalty collections at home and abroad last year. Although receipts from TV broadcasters edged down, rises elsewhere, notably from general licensing, live music, and radio more than made up the difference. Mechanical collections benefited from higher sales of physical formats, and income from digital music services more than doubled. Digital collections as a share of total receipts remain low, due to the limited number of services in the country, but licensing efforts are set to boost this number. Despite slightly higher costs, the authors’ society recorded a rise in distributable revenue last year and a decrease in its cost ratio.

Germany country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Germany music industry report. Retail sales of recorded music in Germany are on something of a roll at the moment. German trade association BVMI reported a fourth consecutive year of growth in January, with a big jump in revenue from subscriptions and streaming fully offsetting the falls in spending on CD albums and music downloads. Although revenue from access services now accounts for the biggest share of digital music income, CD albums remain the most popular format for German consumers. Authors’ society GEMA has also registered four straight years of revenue growth with total collections last year, topping €1bn ($1.1bn) for the first time. Germany’s live music sector continues to deliver stable results. However, there have been some notable shifts within the market, largely following the entry of Live Nation at the beginning of 2016.

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Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

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New issue of Music & Copyright with France country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

German recorded music sector on track for another year of growth
Figures published by the German music trade body Bundesverband Musikindustrie (BVMI) show that total consumer spending on recorded music was up 3.6% in the first half of this year compared with the same six-month period in 2015. A big jump in music subscriptions was behind the overall rise, with the increase in consumer spending on paid audio on-demand services fully offsetting all other format declines. The continued revival of the vinyl LP also boosted total retail sales. Despite the fall in spending on CD albums, the format still accounted for the majority of music retail sales. However, the boom in streaming sales pushed Germany ever closer to the digital tipping point.

Second consecutive year of decline for Polish royalty collections
Polish authors’ society ZAiKS has reported its financial statements for 2015. Although collections in the year were down compared with 2014, they were still the third highest in the authors’ society history. Total distributions were also one of the highest on record, while the administration rate remained virtually unchanged year-on-year. Broadcasting remained the biggest income source for ZAiKS. However, most of the main sources of broadcast income were down, resulting in an overall broadcast collection decline. The only real domestic bright spots for ZAiKS came from a small rise in collections from background music, public performance, and neighboring rights. Internet collections fell sharply along with private copying remuneration.

SIAE reports positive year for Italian live entertainment in 2015
The Italian live events sector experienced a positive 2015 according to new figures published by the Italian authors’ society SIAE. Following on from a fairly flat 2014, total box office receipts in 2015 registered a healthy rise, with concerts generating the biggest gains and a return to growth after a decline in 2014. Attendance reversed the previous year’s dip and increased in 2015, although the rate of growth was lower than box office spending and audience turnover. In addition to concerts, box office receipts from cinemas also experienced a reversal of fortune and registered an increase, cementing the cinema sector as the Italian entertainment industry’s biggest sector. Dance was the only sector to suffer a decline in box office receipts.

France country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed France music industry profile. The French recorded music industry is currently suffering due to the ongoing transitions from physical to digital and ownership to access. Consumer interest in streaming is maintaining overall growth in digital trade earnings, but falling sales of both downloads and CD albums have pulled down overall record company earnings. There is, however, some hope that this year will see a return to growth, with midyear trade revenue up year-on-year. French authors’ society SACEM registered a positive 12 months with collections increasing after a slight year-on-year decline in 2014. France’s live music industry is highly competitive with national and international promoters battling to represent big names. However, the last 12 months have been particularly difficult for the sector following a number of terrorist attacks.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

New issue of Music & Copyright with Germany country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

ASCAP collections top $1bn for the second consecutive year
US performing rights organization ASCAP has reported a new record for royalty collections with revenue exceeding $1bn for the second year running. The growth came solely from domestic collections with all the major revenue sources recording an increase. Overseas collections were down with distributions to ASCAP members also suffering a decline. ASCAP’s operating expense ratio edged down while the number of performances tracked, matched, and processed for payment rose sharply. Last year ASCAP became the first performing rights organization (PRO) in the US to provide share ownership information in its publicly available online database for the 10 million–plus musical compositions in its repertory.

PRS for Music reports record year for performance royalties
UK authors’ society PRS for Music has reported a record year for performance royalty collections with all the main income sources registering a year-on-year rise. International royalties, the authors’ society’s biggest income source, returned to growth after a dip in 2014 with collections boosted by a number of exceptional payments, cable settlements, and higher broadcasting revenue. Distributions were also up last year compared with 2014 along with net distributable income. However, costs rose sharply, largely because of certain exceptional costs and one-off expenses associated with litigation and planned investments. As a result, the cost-to-income ratio increased year on year.

Big quarter for WMG as streaming takes the recorded music lead
WMG has reported details of the second quarter of its current financial year ending September 2016. Revenue in the January to March period was up at both current and constant exchange rates compared with the first three months of 2015. Notably, revenue from streaming has overtaken that of physical formats to become the biggest source of income for recorded music. Revenue from artist services and expanded rights also increased along with digital and synchronization earnings for the publishing division Warner Chappell. WMG noted that the fall in recorded music licensing earnings was mostly down to the impact of a large initial distribution of PLG neighboring rights income in the second quarter of the previous financial year.

Germany country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Germany music industry profile. Retail sales of recorded music in Germany are on something of a roll at the moment. Trade association BVMI reported a third consecutive year of growth in January thanks to a big jump in revenue from subscriptions and streaming fully offsetting the falls in spending on CD albums and music downloads. Although revenue from access services now accounts for the biggest share of digital music income, CD albums remain the most popular format for German consumers. Authors’ society GEMA has also registered three straight years of revenue growth with total collections last year just edging past the previous year’s record total. Germany’s live industry, the biggest in Europe, is in good shape. The setting up of a Live Nation office in the country has heightened competition in an already competitive sector.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

New issue of Music & Copyright with Germany country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

PWC charts the recorded music gloom and live music boom
PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) has published its annual assessment and forecasts for the recorded music and live music industry sectors. The figures make healthy reading for those involved in the live sector, but, despite the forecast rise of digital, the steady fall in sales of CD albums will mean total recorded music sales will continue to shrink for the next five years at least. Overall, combined revenue from live and recorded music will grow annually in the five years up to and including 2019, edging ever closer to the magical $50bn mark.

Collections return to growth for JASRAC in 2014
Japanese authors’ society JASRAC has reported a return to growth for royalty collections in the 12 months to the end of March 2015, after a decline in the previous 12-month period. Despite a fall in both mechanicals and overseas revenue, the rise in domestic performance income, most notably from live performance, boosted overall collections. Broadcasting remained the biggest single source of earnings for Japanese authors. Digital collections edged up in line with the total increase in digital-music sales in Japan last year.

Digital and broadcasting gains boost STIM revenue to record high
Swedish authors’ society STIM has reported another record financial year with total collections and distributions to its members topping the previous records set in 2013. Digital collections were again the star performer with income from digital music services accounting for the second biggest share of domestic income sources. A better year for advertising in Sweden boosted commercial broadcast collections. However, royalties from festivals and live music concerts suffered a big drop after a sharp rise in 2013.

SFX Entertainment and the need to curb its EDM ambitions
SFX Entertainment has had a short and eventful life. The electronic dance music (EDM) specialist is only three years old but, not short on ambition, it has adopted an acquisitions-led growth strategy that has turned it into a $350m-a-year company. But rapid expansion has come at a cost and SFX has yet to turn a profit. For the company’s striving CEO, that does not seem to pose much of a problem. But SFX is listed on the NASDAQ exchange, its stock price has suffered, and its strategy has been heavily criticized. Now the company, which only launched its IPO at the tail-end of 2013, is looking to de-list and get out of the spotlight. But it is not clear that SFX will fare any differently as a private company if it does not change its high-growth tack. Moreover, it may not survive as a stand-alone entity.

Germany country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Germany music industry profile. Retail sales of recorded-music in Germany increased for the second consecutive year in 2014. German trade association BVMI reported a 1.8% rise in consumer spending on recorded music compared with 2013. Revenue from subscriptions and streaming fully offset the falls in spending on music downloads and CD album sales. However, despite the digital transition gathering pace, physical formats still account for more than two-thirds of consumer spending. In line with recorded music spending, authors’ society GEMA also reported a second consecutive year of collection growth. Despite difficult market conditions, GEMA said collections were positive for almost all of its business sectors with digital experiencing the highest growth. Germany’s live industry, the biggest in Europe, is in good shape with new festival launches heightening an already competitive sector.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.