New issue of Music & Copyright with Mexico country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

Final judgment and permanent injunction filing details the end of Youtube-mp3.org
Almost exactly one year ago, the RIAA, on behalf of the three major record companies and some of their subsidiary labels, filed legal action at the US District Court for the Central District of California against the operator of stream-ripping website Youtube-mp3.org. Now, following a new filing, this time detailing a final judgment and permanent injunction against the site and its owner, the RIAA along with the IFPI and BPI have confirmed in a joint statement that the site has shut down. The filing detailed the terms agreed by Youtube-mp3.org’s creator, Philip Matesanz. Although the permanent closure of the world’s most popular stream-ripping service is good news for the music industry, stream-ripping has become the most prevalent form of music piracy in the online world, and there are plenty of other services that are likely to take over Youtube-mp3.org’s role in facilitating the popular form of music piracy.

Italy’s recorded-music sector suffers midyear fall in CD album sales and audio subscriptions
New figures published by Italian music trade association FIMI suggest that the country might well be heading for a full-year contraction after four consecutive years of growth. Just two years ago, FIMI was reporting growth of more than 20% in the first half of 2015, with sales of both physical and digital formats and services rising sharply. Last year, paid subscriptions just managed to offset the fall in both CD album and download sales. However, in the first half of this year, trade earnings from paid subscriptions were flat, so the drop in CD album sales has resulted in lower overall trade revenue. FIMI commented that the reason for the slowdown was largely to do with the lack of any big-name Italian artist releases. The trade association also highlighted the positive six-month period for vinyl.

Technology developments set to enhance the digital music experience
Disruption is an overused word, but many in the music industry know first hand what it means, having taken a hammering from file-sharing technology and aggressive pirating operations in recent times. Piracy remains an issue for the industry, but the outlook is no longer as negative thanks to the popularity of streaming services: Consumers may no longer want to own music, but an increasing number are demonstrating that they are prepared to make regular subscription payments to gain access to millions of tracks. However, like all new technology, streaming is a double-edged sword. Taking its cue from Ovum’s consumer Trends to Watch report series, this research note picks out three key trends – two tech innovations and one relating to legislation – that music industry players should keep an eye on in 2018.

Mexico country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Mexico music industry report. Mexico is South America’s second-largest recorded-music market and the continent’s biggest live market. Following two years of decline in 2013 and 2014, record company earnings from recorded music sales and services registered impressive growth in 2015 and 2016, with the rise driven by a big jump in music subscriptions. Mexico crossed the digital tipping point in 2014, and the gap between digital and physical has subsequently widened significantly.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

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New issue of Music & Copyright with Mexico country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

Midyear trade results hint at a very positive year for global recorded-music sales
All of the world’s major recorded-music markets and a good number of smaller ones have published midyear trade figures. Based on the numbers, combined global trade revenue from the sale of physical and digital recorded music and income from music access services could rise at the highest rate for more than 20 years. All trade associations that have published figures, with the exception of Japan’s RIAJ, have shown continued gains from music subscription services, with the growth more than offsetting declines in earnings from other formats. The ongoing dominance of a small number of markets means a return to global growth will remain in the hands of the few. However, a good performance from some of the world’s so-called emerging markets will determine just how big the annual rise will be.

Music industry takes aim at stream-ripping site Youtube-mp3.org
Two weeks after the IFPI published the results of a study that identified a rise in the use of stream-ripping services, US and UK music trade associations have ramped up the pressure on the world’s biggest such site, Germany-based Youtube-mp3.org. In the US, legal proceedings have been filed in a federal court in California against the site and its owner for copyright infringement. In the UK, the BPI has put the stream-ripping site on formal notice of intended legal action if it does not cease infringing. The practice of stream ripping has been around for several years, and legal action has only once before been brought against Youtube-mp3.org. That case had little effect on the workings of the service, and the number of stream-ripping sites available to Internet users has subsequently grown unchecked. However, with concerted legal action taking place on both sides of the Atlantic, Youtube-mp3.org and other stream rippers are facing a new reality.

Post-pirate Napster needs new friends to stay in the music stream
File-sharing pioneer Napster is back in the US market, badging the established Rhapsody music-streaming service. After being acquired by Rhapsody in 2011, the Napster brand finally replaced Rhapsody in June in the US, the only market not to be fronted by the famous cat logo. However, while Napster proved to be a major disruptive force at the turn of the century, its current iteration is no match for leading streamers such as Spotify and Apple Music. That leaves the offering competing against a raft of lesser, but still powerful, undifferentiated streaming platforms. Nothing in Rhapsody/Napster’s history suggests that its music offering can cut through, and its fate might well be to be of streaming’s also-rans.

Mexico country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Mexico music industry report. Mexico is Latin America’s second largest recorded music market and the region’s biggest live market. After two years of decline, record company earnings from recorded music sales and services registered impressive growth in 2015. This rise was driven solely by a big jump in music subscriptions. Mexico crossed the digital tipping point in 2014, and the gap between digital and physical widened significantly last year. SME maintained its lead as the biggest record company in Mexico with a slight increase in market share over second-placed UMG. Mexico’s biggest events company, Interamericana de Entretenimiento, registered a big rise in earnings in 2015, and results so far this year from the company suggest that 2016 will be another profitable year.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

New issue of Music & Copyright with Mexico country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

European Parliament adopts MEP Julia Reda’s copyright report
The European Parliament has voted by a large majority to adopt MEP Julia Reda’s report on the EU Copyright Directive 2001/29/EC. The report addressed provisions in the copyright directive that its author said had not been able to keep step with the increase of online cross-border cultural exchange. It called for an urgent review of copyright legislation and for a harmonization of copyright across Europe. Following the vote, a number organizations welcomed the Parliament’s backing of a fair balance between the rights and interests of creators and consumers, but their differences on what the vote represented and what course of action the EU should now take suggests a difficult few months ahead before the European Commission presents its specific copyright reform proposals.

Positive first six months of 2015 for recorded music sales in Germany
Figures published by the German music trade body Bundesverband Musikindustrie (BVMI) show total consumer spending on recorded music grew 4.4% in the first six months of this year compared with the same period of 2014. A big jump in music subscriptions was the main reason for the growth, but the continued revival of the vinyl LP and an unexpected rise in sales of album downloads also boosted overall sales. Despite a decline in spending on CD albums, the format still accounted for the majority of music retail sales. The boom in streaming sales meant combined spending on music subscriptions and advertising income from streaming services accounted for almost 13% of total sales.

ZAiKS bemoans low digital gains as collections edge down in 2014
Polish authors’ society ZAiKS has reported its financial statements for 2014. At a press conference, ZAiKS’ vice president Marek Hojda and CEO Piotr Wąsaty said total collections were down slightly compared with 2013, but were still the second highest in the society’s history. Moreover, the administration rate was down, to 16.4%, from 17.1%. Broadcasting was the biggest income source for ZAiKS. However, despite an increase in public service TV income, a decrease in public service radio and commercial TV collections meant overall broadcasting income was down. A big jump in cinema collections boosted public performance earnings but the ongoing shift to digital from physical recorded music formats meant mechanical collections for ZAiKS continued to fall.

Mexico country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Mexico music industry profile. Mexico is Latin America’s second largest recorded music market and the region’s biggest live market. Although record company income from the sale of recorded music is suffering from the steady transition away from physical formats and, more recently, digital downloads, rising interest in streaming offers more than just a glimmer of hope for a return to trade revenue growth. SME maintained its lead as the biggest record company in Mexico, although a rise in share for second-placed UMG has closed the gap on the leader. Mexico’s biggest events company, Interamericana de Entretenimiento, suffered a fall in live music income in 2014. However, this year has started well for the promoter with revenue growth and a big jump in net income.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.