Tagged: publishing

New issue of Music & Copyright with Spain country report

The latest issue of Music & Copyright is now available for subscribers to download. Here are some of the highlights.

Flat year for authors’ royalty collections in 2014
Combined royalty collections for the 20 biggest authors’ societies and organizations that have published results increased 1.6% in 2014. Although the growth rate was down on the 2.8% rise in 2013, it marked the second consecutive year of rising collections after a slight dip in 2012. French authors’ society SACEM was the leader in terms of collections, with European collective rights management organizations (CMOs) accounting for the top three positions. However, the US is the clear leader in terms of authors’ collections at country level with combined collections by the rights organizations ASCAP and BMI surpassing the $2bn mark. Europe is biggest region, accounting for more than half of the global total.

Big jump in global performance rights earnings in 2014
Performance rights distributions broke new records in 2014 with total payments rising to their highest levels and distributions to performers topping $1bn for the first time. Often seen as the poor relation to authors’ rights, combined global payments to producers and performers exceeded $2.4bn and accounted for just under 15% of global recorded music industry revenue. Global receipts from performance rights remain dominated by the US organization SoundExchange and the continued growth in payments to SoundExchange is the biggest source of growth for the performance rights sector. However, even excluding the US organization, distributions to performers and producers were still up on 2013, albeit by a reduced rate.

Music goes mobile in India with Saavn leading the charge
Indian digital music provider Saavn had been grabbing headlines recently as “India’s answer to Spotify.” The company secured a huge injection of cash last summer and has some high-profile names in its management team, while its user numbers are growing apace. But Saavn faces some serious competition, not least from powerful telcos such as Airtel. Moreover, Apple Music landed in India during the summer and is clearly very well placed to take market share. As elsewhere, digital music consumption is migrating to mobile, so getting services right on that platform in a fast-growing smartphone market will be key. Content will be important too, with local music an essential part of the mix for Indian consumers.

Spain country report
In addition to the usual set of music industry statistics and news briefs, the latest issue of Music & Copyright includes a detailed Spain music industry profile. Spain’s music industry is on something of a roll at the moment after many years of contraction. Recorded music sales increased in 2014, the first time in 12 years, and have continued to rise this year. Royalty collections in the country edged up in 2014 after three straight years of decline. The live sector also registered a positive year with turnover up and prospects for 2015 thought to be good. The optimistic figures come at a time when the Spanish economy is showing real signs of improvement. However, it is worth remembering that the music industry, particularly the recorded music sector, has a long way to go before it can declare itself out of the woods. Also, the live sector is continuing to push for a lowering of the VAT rate on cultural events, which continues to exert downward pressure on promoters’ earnings.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

Recorded music market share gains for WMG in 2014, Sony/ATV is the publishing leader

The annual survey by Ovum publication Music & Copyright of the recorded music and music publishing sectors has revealed that recorded-music leader UMG lost market share in 2014, mainly as a result of the sale of the Parlophone Label Group (PLG) to WMG in 2013, which formed part of EMI Recorded Music acquisition requirements. UMG’s loss was WMG’s gain and the smallest of the three majors narrowed the gap on second-placed SME. Sony/ATV held its lead in music publishing, but the collective share of the independent publishing sector was the highest overall.

Majors cede a little recorded-music market share to the independents
Following two years of consolidation in the recorded-music and music-publishing sectors after the breakup of EMI Music Group and the subsequent sales of EMI’s record and publishing divisions, restructuring and company selloffs have had an impact on the market share figures for the major music groups in 2014.
UMG acquired EMI Recorded Music and a Sony-led consortium of companies bought EMI Music Publishing in 2012. National and regulatory approval required a number of company sales, which were completed with the sale of the PLG in July 2013. The timing of the sale meant year-on-year market-share comparisons for UMG and WMG this year and in 2013 were affected. Moreover, at the time of the PLG acquisition by WMG, the major said it would sell some of the PLG assets, or their equivalent value of owned assets, to independent companies. Strong interest by the independent sector has delayed the asset sales with more than 140 companies reported to have bid for around 11,000 artist catalogs. Should the selloffs be completed this year, WMG’s 2015 market share may well be negatively affected.

UMG is the recorded-music leader despite a market share dip
According to Music & Copyright’s annual survey of the music industry, UMG had a 34.1% share of the combined physical and digital recorded music trade revenue last year, down from 36.7% in 2013. For physical revenue only, UMG’s share stood at 32.3%, while its digital share was 36.1%. SME was the second-largest music company, with a virtually unchanged combined physical/digital market share of 22.5%.

Record companies, physical and digital revenue market shares, 2012–14
Recorded shares 2014
Source: Music & Copyright

The smallest of the three majors, WMG, was the only company to experience an increase in both physical and digital shares: Its share of revenue from physical recorded music sales was 15.7% in 2014, up from 14.8% in 2013, while the share gain was slightly lower for digital, rising to 17.7%, from 17.1%. WMG’s combined physical/digital share grew, to 16.7%, from 15.8%.
The independent record companies’ share of combined physical/digital revenue also rose last year, to 26.7%, from 25.1% in 2013. The sector increased its share of both physical and digital revenue. However, the independents’ share of physical formats is still higher than its digital share.

A healthy year for music publishing
Music & Copyright has calculated that global music publishing revenue grew 2.5% in 2014, to $4.05bn, from $3.95bn in 2013. Despite a virtually unchanged market share in 2014 of 29.5%, Sony/ATV, the joint venture between Sony and the Michael Jackson Estate, remained the global publishing leader. Although Sony/ATV and EMI MP are still separate companies, with EMI MP repertoire administered by Sony/ATV, Music & Copyright has combined the companies’ shares. EMI MP is the larger of the two companies in terms of tracks owned and administered, with a publishing catalog of around 2 million tracks, compared with 1.6 million for Sony/ATV.

Music publishing companies, revenue market shares, 2012–14
Publishing shares
Source: Music & Copyright

UMPG is the second-largest music publisher. The company’s market share edged up slightly last year, to 23.0%, from 22.6% in 2013. Warner Chappell was the only major music publisher to suffer a fall in share in 2014.

Independent companies hold the lead
Independent music publishers have long dominated music publishing and compete well with the majors for major artists’ attention. Last year, the independent music publishing sector experienced a small increase in share: Music & Copyright estimates that independent companies accounted for 35.0% of global publishing revenue, compared with 34.8% in 2013.
BMG Rights Management is the biggest of the independent music publishers and has gained share consistently through a mixture of company acquisitions and administration deals. Music & Copyright estimates that BMG’s share of global music publishing revenue was 5.4% in 2014, up from 5.1% in 2013.
Kobalt has also made gains in the last few years, although increased revenue for the company has come from organic growth rather than through company acquisition. Music & Copyright estimates that Kobalt’s share of global publishing revenue increased to 3.9% last year, from 3.5% in 2013.

If you want to know more about Music & Copyright then follow the below links.

Music & Copyright is published by Ovum.

Demystifying Pan-European digital-music rights, second edition

Report coverInforma Telecoms & Media today announced the publication of the second edition of its highly successful report Demystifying Pan-European digital-music rights. The report neatly illustrates what repertoire is controlled by what collection society or licensing hub in 30 of Europe’s most vibrant recorded-music markets. Continue reading

Is repertoire fragmentation the new enemy of digital-music services in Europe?

Last year the European Commission introduced new proposals for a directive on the collective management of copyright and multiterritory licensing of music. The proposals, which target collection-society transparency and the efficient working of digital-distribution businesses in Europe, are working their way through a series of committees. After that, they must be agreed upon by the European Parliament and European Council of Ministers.

What the directive will not do is interfere with the way music publishers administer their rights. All of the major publishers and a number of independents have withdrawn the rights to certain repertoire for licensing on a multiterritorial basis. Some see these moves as a step towards the creation of a new form of fragmentation, one based on repertoire, rather than national borders. Publishers have long claimed that withdrawing certain repertoire rights streamlines the licensing process. However, music ownership can involve multiple publishers and therefore digital services that want to provide an all-encompassing offering still need to sign more licensing deals than the number of countries they operate in. Continue reading

A short history of the music industry: different formats, familiar names but the same old problems

M&C coverIn the past 20 years or so, all sectors of the music industry have been through massive change. Format transitions, company consolidation and greater scrutiny of copyright and licensing have changed the industry beyond all recognition. But have the changes made for industry improvements, and more important, have the main players learned from their mistakes? The recent discovery of the first issues of Music & Copyright has allowed for a unique look at just how much certain things have changed, and how much they haven’t.

The newsletter’s 20-year anniversary came and went in September, but thanks to a long-standing subscriber, copies of the first 24 issues published have been found and make for interesting reading. Despite containing names that have either long since left the music industry or been swallowed up as part of industry consolidation, the headlines for a number of news stories resonate closely with happenings today. Continue reading

Big differences in splits for digital-music performance and mechanical rights in EU-27

As the issue of multiterritory licensing comes under the spotlight in Europe, differences in rates charged and rights splits will become more evident. Will an EU directive that breaks down national borders be followed by a bigger push for deeper collection-society harmonization across the region?

With publication of the European Commission’s new multiterritory licensing proposals, Brussels’ efforts to harmonize the EU’s digital-music landscape are looking to build on legislation harmonizing authors’ and publishers’ rights that are managed by collection societies. Continue reading

Demystifying Pan-European digital music rights – new report

The number of digital-music services in Europe is growing every year and consumers across the continent are being presented with an array of different ways to listen to music. Digital-music delivery and consumption has undergone a rapid transition. However, such has been the speed of the sector’s evolution, new business models specializing in digital-music delivery across Europe have forced those organizations charged with issuing licenses to rethink the way they operate.

Music publishers and collection-societies in Europe have taken to the task in different ways (see below table for major music publisher initiative details). But, in contrast to a few years ago, when digital-music services were required to negotiate countless licensing deals, agreements between music publishers and collection-societies have reduced the necessity for endless rounds of licensing negotiations. Continue reading